Types of Vision

Emmetropia

If you have emmetropia it means you have ideal distance vision and don’t need lenses to correct your vision.

Nearsightedness

If you are nearsighted it means that you can see well up close, but things at a distance appear blurry. Nearsightedness occurs when the cornea (the front of the eye) is too steep, or the eye is too long, and the light rays focus in front of the retina, rather than on the retina as they should. This condition can be corrected by glasses, contacts, lens implants or LASIK.

Farsightedness

If you are farsighted it means you can see well at a distance, but things up close are blurry. Farsightedness occurs when the cornea (the front of the eye) is too flat or the eye is too short, and the light rays focus behind the retina, rather than on the retina as they should. This condition can be corrected by glasses, contacts, lens implants, or in some cases LASIK.

Astigmatism

If you have astigmatism it means that your eye is not round, and instead is shaped like a football. This causes some of the light rays to focus on the retina and some to focus in front or behind the retina. This visual distortion can produce shadows, double images, or ghosting. Often people will have astigmatism combined with nearsightedness or farsightedness. This condition can be corrected by glasses, contacts, lens implants or in many cases LASIK.

Presbyopia

Sometime between the ages of 40-50 people start to have difficulty with reading vision. As the eye ages, the lens in the eye becomes harder, so the muscles have a more difficult time focusing the lens. This is called presbyopia. This condition can be corrected with reading glasses, contacts, lens implants and in some cases LASIK.